High School Course Descriptions                                          

Social Science

Geography, Grade 9

Geography has become an increasingly important topic in an ever shrinking world. Just as we must know and understand our own culture and nation, we must also have an unbiased understanding of other nations and cultures to function in a multicultural, global environment. Coursework will include a thorough understanding and application of the following topics: major landforms, climates, and ecosystems of earth; how to present geographical information in a variety of assessment formats, which include essay composition and document analysis and assessment of the role of important individuals, places, and environments and their relationships to each other. Students will also discover the role of cause and effect in understanding historical events and examine their effects on the development of our modern government

Ancient World History, Grade 10

This class covers major developments in World History from the end of the Prehistoric Era to 1500 AD. Students will be introduced to ideas, government systems, cultures, and social workings of classic Western civilizations such as Greece and Rome in addition to societies and empires in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Eastern Europe. Students will discover how various civilizations interacted and influenced each other through economic exchange, military conquest, and cultural assimilation. Besides the content, students will learn a number of critical thinking and writing skills relevant to history as well as other social studies disciplines. The skills that will be emphasized in this class include primary source analysis and ability to form effective and convincing argument orally and in writing

Modern World History, Grade 11

This class covers major developments in World History from 1500 AD to the Present. Students will be introduced to ideas, government systems, cultures, and social workings of modern societies. In addition to the content, students will learn a number of critical thinking and writing skills relevant to history as well as other social studies’ disciplines. The skills that will be emphasized in this class include primary source analysis and ability to form effective and convincing argument orally and in writing.

Government and Economics, Grade 12

This course is divided into two portions: Government and Economics. In the fall semester we will cover Government. Economics will be taught during the spring semester. The first goal of the class will be to achieve an understanding of the government and economic systems in the U.S. and around the world. Second, students will be exposed to the political process and its importance throughout the United States and other countries. A third goal of this class is to learn practical and useful skills, such as personal budgeting, which are relevant to everyday life.

 

First Semester: Government
Foundations and Purpose of Government; The American and Chinese Government Structures; The Political Process; Civil Liberties; Civil Rights; International Relations; Government Project


Second Semester: Economics
Economics and Choice; Market Economies at Work; Partners in the Economies/ Trade; Money and Banking; Measuring and Monitoring Economic Performance; Stock Markets; The Role of Government in the Economy; Personal Budgeting and Investing

Mathematics

Geometry

This course is designed to prepare freshmen students for Scientific, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. The course focuses on the development of problem-solving skills and the acquisition of mathematical vocabulary and symbols. The active engagement of students along with the use of manipulatives and technology, such as interactive computer programs and calculators, will allow students to develop an understanding of the geometric principles they are learning. Topics include reasoning and proof, lines and their relationships, triangles and their relationships, polygons and quadrilaterals, similarity, right triangles, properties of circles, properties of transformations, and area and volume. Students will gain an appreciation of the structure of geometry and develop powers of spatial visualization

Algebra II

Algebra II is designed to prepare sophomore students for Scientific, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields and further courses of study. The course focuses on the development of problem-solving skills and the acquisition of mathematical vocabulary and symbols, particularly as they relate to mathematical functions and analysis. The active engagement of students along with the use of manipulatives and technology, such as interactive computer programs and calculators, will allow students to develop an intuitive and geometric understanding of the algebraic principles they are learning through investigation and modeling. Topics include complex numbers; functions and graphs; systems of equations and inequalities; polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions and equations; and sequences and series. 

Precalculas

Precalculus is designed to prepare students for Scientific, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields and further courses of study, particularly focusing on skills needed for success in Advanced Placement mathematics courses. The course develops problem-solving skills and the acquisition of mathematical vocabulary and symbols, particularly as they relate to mathematical functions and analysis. The active engagement of students along with the use of manipulatives and technology, such as interactive computer programs and calculators, will allow students to develop an intuitive and geometric understanding of the mathematical principles they are learning through investigation and modeling. This rigorous course extends concepts of intermediate algebra while introducing various topics of college algebra. Topics include function and graph analysis, trigonometric functions and analysis, vectors and parametric functions, conic sections, matrices, sequences and series, polar coordinates, exponential and logarithmic functions, and limits.

Calculus

Calculus at AIAN is a one-year course in Differential and Integral Calculus that prepares students to pursue higher mathematics in college. Over the course of the academic year, students will expand their knowledge in the following areas: – Limits and Continuity, The Derivative, Applications of the Derivative, The Definite Integral, Applications of the Derivative , Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling and Applications of Definite Integrals. A graphing calculator (the TI- 84 Plus Silver Edition) is required for this course.

Statistics & Probability

An introductory course in statistics and probability covering topics such as probability, correct probabilistic reasoning, distributions, graphical and descriptive methods, sampling estimation, hypotheses and statistical inference. Students will learn basic rules of probability and be able to use them in modeling uncertainty in obtaining and recording data. They will be able to utilize graphical and numerical summaries of data in understanding data generating processes. They will understand the logic of statistical inference and will be able to apply common inferential procedures. Students will be exposed to the computational aspects of statistics through the use of calculators, spreadsheet programs or special purpose data analysis packages.

 

 

Language Arts

Language Arts, Grade 9

This course continues the development of students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Students will read short stories, non-fiction selections, novels, poems and plays that focus on the overreaching theme of 'Coming of Age' and extensive use of literary terminology, figurative language, and reading strategies, the writing process and appropriate grammar. Students respond to literature through narrative, informational and persuasive writing and speaking assignments. Students also have the opportunity to respond to reading selections through media other than writing. Vocabulary development and the study of grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling continue. 

Language Arts, Grade 10

This course combines vocabulary development with extensive reading and writing. Students read for common themes that permeate literature from Early Greece and Rome to contemporary international literature. Students also practice the writing process in activities designed to assist them in finding their own voice in writing and in developing a mature style. An emphasis on description produces writing that demonstrates the importance of color, sound and movement. There is a strong emphasis on the development of vocabulary and building on the course content of Grade 9. Students will also produce a 3,000 word research project.

Language Arts, Grade 11

Building on the course content of Grade 10, students focus on vocabulary development and engage in specific reading, writing and higher thinking skills to prepare for testing and college level experiences. Students learn to critically evaluate what they read and write: they explore representative works of American literature including Scott Fitzgerald, Arthur Miller, Hemingway and Poe short stories and world literature, such as Shakespeare and Camus. They will respond to reading through discussion, presentations and writing. Emphasis is placed on the writing process; modules include narratives, informational papers, persuasive essays, comparison/contrast compositions, and literary analyses.

Language Arts, Grade 12

The overall theme of the course centers on perspectives, both our own and other peoples, and how they shape us and our world. The course examines multiple critical theories used to analyze international literature, and the student will use these theories to analyze texts by various writers including Shakespeare, Orwell and Maugham and compose their own texts. Poetry will focus on the dramatic monologue form in addition to more contemporary works. Forms of writing may include the college application essay, critical reviews, literary analysis, and a research paper. Writing techniques emphasize style and tone appropriate to a particular purpose and audience. Vocabulary is college preparatory related to the content of the course. The students study representative works of British, American and world literature and incorporate thinking and writing skills to analyze literary selections.

Science

Physical Science, Grade 9

Physical science is the study of matter and energy. From the collisions of molecules within our cells to the inner workings of a refrigerator, this course will help the students to better appreciate the natural laws by which our physical world operates. This course provides a good grounding in HS science.

Biology Grade 10

The purpose of this course is to give students a working knowledge of the structure and functions of the human body. The emphasis will be on anatomy but physiological processes will also be addressed. This is a course best suited for those wishing to pursue a degree in the health fields or for those with a suitable interest in the subject. Coursework will include a thorough understanding and application of the following topics: identifying parts of the body and discussing its functions, understanding dysfunctions and learning the current trends in technology and their effects on the body.

Chemistry, Grade 11

Chemistry

High School Electives

Band

Band is an elective course where entrance and placement is contingent upon the student's basic level of performance. Instrumental lessons are available to any student who demonstrates an interest in acquiring proficiency in a particular instrument. The band performs at two major concerts throughout the year and performs in various assemblies for the school system and public functions. Band provides an opportunity for students to grow and develop musically and promotes the development of the students understanding of musical skills and musical concepts. It also promotes an educational environment that fosters musical excellence and student growth as an ensemble.

Chinese Conversation

This course is designed to train students with basic Chinese study basic to communicate with others in Chinese fluently, systematically. The class will use speaking and listening comprehension, daily dialogues and phrases with cultural notes to strengthen the students' Chinese abilities. Students are also encouraged to practice speaking in front of others. I hope that these activities will make the class an enjoyable learning experience and my aim is to help students develop further communication skills in Chinese.

Computer Hardware / Robotics

Are you interested in learning about computers including tearing them apart and putting them back together? Want to learn how write an app.  Interested in learning about and building robots?  This is the class for you.  This class allows you learn about it but actually allows you to get your hands dirty and do it.  This class is open to any 9th through 12th grade student.

Drawing

This drawing course is focused on refining the skills students have developed in the elementary and middle school. Following the expectations laid out in the AERO curriculum, students are required to organize materials, plan artworks and develop a portfolio of finished drawings. They will also be required to reflect upon their own work, and participate in group critiques. Throughout this course, students will use a wide range of drawing media, as they refine their existing drawing skills and are introduced to a range of more advanced drawing techniques.

Film Studies

In Film Studies, students experience both the creative and technical aspects of filmmaking in conjunction with learning about historical and contemporary traditions. Story writing, story-based display (story boards), basic visual composition, and general reproduction skills will be included with camera techniques, animation, and line action planning. Traditional filmmaking   may be extended with video and multimedia technologies. Interdisciplinary experiences and arts activities lead to refining a personal aesthetic, and a heightened understanding of career opportunities in art and arts-related fields. Students will explore a variety of film styles, by creating works in a variety of styles including but not limited to: product advertisement, stop-motion animation, documentaries, and movie trailer re-edits.

High School Art

High School Art is designed for students who wish to explore a wide range of media and artistic techniques. These include, but are not limited to: drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, graphic design. Students in High School Art are strongly encouraged to challenge themselves and push beyond their own perceived level of ability. The teaching approach is one which challenges students to develop their problem solving and critical thinking skills through creativity and self-expression.

Introduction to Computer Science

This course is designed to offer an introduction to computer science. Students will learn the basics of computer programming along with the basics of computer science. The material emphasizes computational thinking and helps develop the ability to solve complex problems. This semester course covers the basic building blocks of programming along with other central elements of computer science, primarily using the Python computer programming language. It gives a foundation in the tools used in computer science and prepares students for further study in computer science, including AP Computer Science Principles and AP Computer Science A courses.
 

Journalism

The Journalism I course offers the terminology necessary for an understanding of the communication process and the opportunity to explore and compare the different forms of mass communication: print and electronic. The curriculum includes the study of the American newspaper past and present and the rights and responsibilities of the journalist. The heart of the course involves learning about gathering and writing news. Class lesson assignments focus on writing in-depth news articles, feature stories, editorials, columns, reviews, and sports. Matters of style involve the students in proofreading. Copy reading practice improves the reporter's writing and develops the ability to edit, e.g., re-organize, reduce, re-focus in order to achieve clarity, conciseness, and completeness, or simply to make a story fit the space allocated in a layout.

Headlining, page makeup and design, photography, and the principles of advertising are other essentials of this course.

Music History

Introduction to the critical study of Western music history, including representative composers, works, and genres, as well as significant concepts and issues. Overview of different stylistic periods in music history. Perspectives include music and philosophy, music and gender, and music and text. Students develop an insight into the manner in which similar questions have been approached in diverse cultures and periods

Physical Education

The physical education program at AIAN ensures the attainment of the basic skills and fitness needed to develop and enjoy a healthy life style. The mental processes of planning, timing, judgment, and recall require the physically active student to be a thinking, responsive individual. Guided physical education experiences raise students to a level of social development characterized by a spirit of cooperation, sportsmanship, and respect for one’s self and others.

US History

In US History we will be looking at significant events and people who helped shape the United States and impact world events.  Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, the Civil War and reconstruction, WWI, WWII, and beyond. Upon completion, student should be able to understand cause and effect while analyzing far reaching effects.

High School Electives - AP Courses

AP Biology

The AP Biology course is designed to enable students to develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. Critical thinking and problem solving activities to achieve big ideas. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college courses — a goal of AP Biology.

This AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course and has been endorsed enthusiastically by higher education officials

 

Organized around Big Ideas:

AP Biology is structured around four big ideas, the enduring understandings within big ideas and the essential knowledge within the enduring understanding.

 

The big ideas:

 

Big Idea 1: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.

 

Big Idea 2: Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building

                  blocks to grow, to reproduce

 

Big Idea 3 Living system store, retrieve transmit and respond to information 

                   essential to life

          

Big Idea 4: Biological system interacts, and these systems and their   

                   interaction process complex process.

 

 

Lab Notebooks and College Credit

Colleges may require students to present their laboratory materials from AP science courses before granting college credit for laboratory, so students are encouraged to retain their laboratory notebooks, reports, and other materials.

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

AP Calculus BC

AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

AP Chinese

The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or the equivalent) college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese. The course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Chinese proficiency across the three communicative modes (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) and the five goal areas (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparison, and Communities) as outline in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. Its aim is to provide students with ongoing and varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Chinese language and culture. The textbook we are using for this course is Barron’s AP Chinese Language and Culture and also some other reference.

AP Chemistry

AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. The goal is that students will take the AP Exam to receive college credit or placement at the student’s college of choice. This course will built on a successfully completed high school chemistry course.

 

Course goals:

·        To prepare students for AP exam as thoroughly as possible

·        To provide college level instruction,

·        To provide college level laboratory instruction.

The Big Ideas and Course Outline:

This course is structured around the six big ideas articulated in the AP Chemistry curriculum framework provided by the College Board.

 

• Big Idea 1: The chemical elements are fundamental building materials of matter, and all matter can be understood in terms of arrangements of atoms. These atoms retain         their identity in chemical reactions.

 

• Big Idea 2: Chemical and physical properties of materials can be explained by the structure and the arrangement of atoms, ions, or molecules and the forces between them.

 

• Big Idea 3: Changes in matter involve the rearrangement and/or reorganization of atoms and/or the transfer of electrons.

 

• Big Idea 4: Rates of chemical reactions are determined by details of the molecular collisions.

 

• Big Idea 5: The laws of thermodynamics describe the essential role of energy and explain and predict the direction of changes in matter.

 

• Big Idea 6: Any bond or intermolecular attraction that can be formed can be broken. These two processes are in a dynamic competition, sensitive to initial conditions   and external perturbations.

 

 

Lab Notebooks and College Credit

Colleges may require students to present their laboratory materials from AP science courses before granting college credit for laboratory, so students are encouraged to retain their laboratory notebooks, reports, and other materials.

AP Computer Science A

AP Computer Science A is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The AP Computer Science A course curriculum is compatible with many CS1 courses in colleges and universities.

AP Computer Science Principles

The Mobile Computer Science Principles course provides an introduction to the basic principles of computer science (CS) from the perspective of mobile computing, including programming in App Inventor, a graphical programming language for Android mobile devices. The lessons and materials used by students incorporate programming while also integrating all other AP CSP big ideas: creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, the internet and global impact. The curriculum engages students and supports the development of problem solving skills honing in on the computational thinking practices as indicated in the AP CSP curriculum framework. Students learn to create socially useful computational artifacts using App Inventor as well as connect computing and learn about abstracting as they develop and analyze their programs. The curriculum also emphasizes communication and collaboration in a project-based approach and classroom environment. This course involves a strong writing component. Students will maintain a portfolio of their work, which will include several performance tasks in the areas of programming and the impact of computing technology.

AP Statistics

The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

AP Studio Art, Grade 11 & 12

AP Studio Art is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of creating Art. Students undergo a rigorous program of  study in which they develop a portfolio of 24 Artworks over the course of the school year. In place of writing a formal exam, students submit their body of work to AP Central for evaluation. The portfolio itself consists of 3 main parts: Breadth, 12 artworks in which students explore a wide variety of ideas, media and artistic subjects, Concentration, 12 artworks which consist of an in depth exploration of a central theme, and Quality, 5 artworks which represent the best work the student is capable of and display a mastery of their selected media and/or techniques.